My Beginner Trail Lessons: Part 7

For a short background on this series, see my first post.  

September 2018 – Highline Trail – Uinta Mts., UT

At the bottom of the east side of Rocky Sea Pass.

This was trip number three in a row that ended in a train wreck (remember how I mentioned in an earlier blog I’m now very thankful when things go to plan). The first three days of this trip went really well. The fourth day not so much. You can read about the hike in this blog post. What lessons did this trip teach me?

First, keep my Camelbak bladder in the tent overnight to reduce the chance of it freezing. While it didn’t end up being a huge problem on this trip, it was definitely an inconvenience I would like to avoid in the future if possible.

Second, carrying a detailed map of the area you plan to hike, as well as a less detailed, broader view map, is a good idea. Thankfully I had both on this trip, and I was able to reference the broader view map to see what other options I had for hiking out had I not been able to get out to the trailhead where I started due to the fire. I wrote a little more detailed blog post about this after this trip.

Third, having a way to communicate with the outside world would have definitely helped with the stress level. If it had come to hiking out to a different trailhead, I would have had no way of letting anybody know that’s where I was. I would have to bank on finding someone who would be willing to give me a ride to my vehicle at the other trailhead. If I had been carrying a satellite communication device like I do now, I could have let my parents know if I hiked to that other trailhead, and at least had them try to contact someone (likely the local ranger office) to see if a ride could be arranged.

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