CDT Prep – June 18, 2021: The Gear

I have had quite a few questions about the gear I will be carrying on my Continental Divide Trail (CDT) hike, so I figured at least a few people would find a blog post about my gear interesting. I have made a couple last minute changes this week (shoes and video equipment), so I’m crossing my fingers those work out. My pack weight is definitely on the heavier side compared to others thru hiking the CDT, which makes me a little nervous. I’m still debating whether or not to leave the umbrella and sandals at home to save a little bit of weight, but for now I plan on bringing them. Outside of the weight, I feel pretty good about this gear, so I don’t anticipate a whole lot of changes along the trail other than getting rid of the snow gear at some point, but we’ll see how it goes. Pictures and a list of my gear are below.


Most of my food for my first two segments of trail. I’ll leave the food for the second segment in East Glacier and pick it up when I hike through there. Huge thanks to Steve’s Gourmet Beef Jerky for helping me out with some free jerky!

My gear.

My clothing.

CDT Prep – June 14, 2021: Prelim Post-Trail Thoughts

If you read my Fears/Struggles/Cons blog, you know that my biggest fears have to do with what happens post trail. One of the main reasons I decided to hike the Continental Divide Trail (CDT) was the opportunity to make some life changes after finishing. So even though I haven’t hit the trail yet, I have put a decent amount of thought into what I would like after finishing the hike. As it stands right now, the plan is to try to find a job I like – in a place I like – quickly after I finish up the trail (more on this below). I would like to find a place where I can settle down, plant roots, and make a difference. A place where I can find community.

With that being said, I have heard many people talk about wanting to do more long thru hikes after they finish their first one, and a 4-5 month thru hike will give me lots of time to consider what I want after the trail. Thus, I realize my post trail plans could be quite different after finishing the hike. However, I want to throw out where I stand at this point so that it can potentially give people ideas on opportunities I would be interested in post trail, and possibly have something lined up quickly after finishing the trail should I decide this is the route I want to go. 


JOBS

The list below contains some criteria that, if met, would place a job high on my list. If a job fits the center of the Venn diagram below (yellow star), it would also be high on my list. If you know of any jobs I might be interested in, please let me know about them or feel free to provide my resume to the appropriate person. You can view my resume by clicking here. Assuming I finish the whole trail, I likely won’t be available for a job until at least late November. If you think I would be interested in a job that doesn’t quite fit this, don’t hesitate to let me know about it.

  1. Has some sort of connection to mountains, backpacking, photography, or art. 
  2. Close to the mountains. 
  3. Close to the CDT (preferably in WY or MT).
  4. At least a somewhat regular schedule, ideally M-F 9 to 5 type.
  5. Frequent 2 sequential days off work (for short backpacking trips). 
  6. At least a couple weeks worth of time off each year.
  7. Somewhere with a good art scene.
  8. Not in a big city.

PLACES

I have listed some towns/cities below that interest me, along with some pros and cons. I’ll definitely consider places that aren’t on this list, but hopefully this gives you an idea of what I’m looking for. 

Pinedale, WY

Pros: Very close to the Wind River Range; close to the CDT; common resupply point for CDT hikers; would be back in my “home state”; has an outdoor gear shop; housing prices don’t seem to be too bad; might be a good place to get my art in front of tourists if I could figure out how to do so. 
Cons: not sure I would want to go this small; job opportunities limited; doesn’t appear to be much of an art scene. 

Lander, WY

Pros: close to the Wind River Range; close to the CDT; common resupply point for CDT hikers; would be back in my “home state”; has a couple outdoor gear shops; has a couple other places with job opportunities I might be interested in (NOLS, The Nature Conservancy); appears to be somewhat of an art scene; seems to be one of the more affordable housing markets; relatively close to extended family in WY
Cons: no big cons I have thought of at this point

Butte, MT

Pros: one of the most affordable housing markets in this list of places; fairly close to several different mountain ranges; has an outdoor gear store; appears to be somewhat of an art scene; on the larger side of towns I’m interested in, so more job & housing opportunities; 
Cons: not a common resupply stop for CDT hikers; on the larger side of town size I would want; is there a reason housing is so affordable?

Helena, MT

Pros: common resupply stop on CDT; several outdoor gear stores; fairly close to Bob Marshall Wilderness; appears to be somewhat of an art scene; on the larger side of towns I’m interested in, so more job & housing opportunities; 
Cons: on the larger side of town size I would want; housing probably on upper end of what I could afford; 

Pagosa Springs, CO

Pros: close to the San Juan Mountains; has an outdoor gear store; somewhat common resupply stop on CDT; appears to be somewhat of an art scene; great place to get my art in front of tourists. 
Cons: Housing possibly too expensive; on the smaller end of town size I would like; 

Cody, WY

Pros: lots of family friends and extended family live here or nearby; close to Beartooth Mountains and Big Horn Mountains; an hour away from where I lived most of my childhood; familiar with the town; a couple outdoor gear stores; somewhat of an art scene; great place to get art in front of tourists; 
Cons: not very close to CDT

Billings, MT

Pros: close to extended family in Cody, WY; has an REI, as well as another outdoor gear store; close to the Beartooth Mountains; on the lower end of housing prices compared to other places I’m interested in; on the larger side of towns I’m interested in, so more job & housing opportunities;
Cons: bigger city than I would prefer; not close to the CDT; 

Bozeman, MT

Pros: have heard great things about this place; close to the Beartooth Mountains; has an REI along with other outdoor gear stores; other places I would be interested in working at (Oboz, Mystery Ranch, Go Fast Campers); appears to have a pretty good art scene; on the larger side of towns I’m interested in, so more job & housing opportunities; 
Cons: I have no idea how I would afford a house here; not close to the CDT; 

Missoula, MT

Pros: have heard great things about this place; amazing place to live for backpacking; close to several different mountain ranges; has an REI and other outdoor gear stores; appears to have a good art scene; know a couple other backpackers who live here; on the larger side of towns I’m interested in, so more job & housing opportunities; potentially a good place to live to host people about to begin or just finishing the CDT;
Cons: not sure if I could afford to purchase a house;

Park City, UT

Pros: close to the Uinta Mountains; great art scene;
Cons: not very close to the CDT; not sure I could afford to buy a house here;

CDT Prep – June 7, 2021: Fears/Struggles/Cons

One common joke in the thru hiking community, although with some truth behind it, is this: you pack your fears. If you fear getting cold, you may bring extra clothes. If you fear animals (or other humans), you may bring some sort of weapon. Two weeks from today my parents and I will be hitting the road for the drive up to Glacier National Park (GNP). While I’m really excited about my upcoming adventure on the Continental Divide Trail (CDT), and whatever happens after that, there are definitely some fears and things I’m not looking forward to, and I have done my best not to pack extra for them. I figured some people would be interested in these, so here is a blog post dedicated to my fears, potential struggles, and cons related to this adventure.


Base Weight: Base weight is the weight of your pack, excluding consumables (food, water, fuel, etc.). Generally the lower the better, although at a certain point it becomes a safety (and comfort) issue. I knew my base weight would be on the heavier side for a couple reasons. First, due to carrying my camera gear. Second, I’m leaning more towards comfort than “ultralight”. I’ll definitely have a heavier pack than a lot of people on the trail, but after putting a lot of thought into it and a doing a couple shakedown hikes, I’m comfortable with where I’m at. If I change my mind I can make changes as I go along. If you’re interested in the gear I will be starting out with, stay tuned to my blog as I plan to post a blog before I leave that shows/lists all my gear.

Nasty Water Sources: In the desert portions of the trail there are likely to be a few nasty water sources that I don’t have any choice but to drink from. Between my filter and tablets, I’m not too worried about getting sick from drinking the water. It will just be overcoming the mental mind game of having to drink the water from the source. 

Cold Weather: I’m not a big fan of cold weather, which is pretty ironic considering my top places to move after finishing the trail are much colder climates. In general, the part of the day I look forward to the least while backpacking is the time between getting out of the sleeping bag in the morning and the start of hiking, as it’s generally chilly in the mornings. Packing up gear in the cold is no fun, especially when it’s wet. I’m sure there are going to be plenty of cold mornings while hiking, and I’m sure there will be entire days that end up being cold. Historically I have pretty much always made a warm breakfast in the morning while backpacking, but to be a little more efficient and get to hiking quicker, I plan on eating stuff for breakfast that doesn’t need cooked. Hopefully getting moving sooner will help out on cold mornings. 

Hike Your Own Hike: This is a popular mantra among thru hikers. The basic premise is pretty simple. If you want to take an alternate route, take the alternate route. If you want to spend an extra day in town, spend an extra day in town. Do the hike how you want to do it, not how others want to do it. While it seems really simple, it isn’t quite so. What happens when I’m hiking around a person or group of people I really enjoy being around, and I want to do something different than the person/group? Will I do my own thing, or will I go with the group? Will I change my pace just to stay with a certain person or people? There can be some really hard decisions around hiking your own hike. Hopefully I can get to the end and be content with the decisions I made. 

Going Poop Outside: Had it not been for the Colorado backpacking trips last year, this probably wouldn’t be as big of a worry. If you read my 2020 Lessons Learned blog, you know that I went poop a lot more on the Colorado trips than I had on previous trips. On the second trip it was particularly hard to find spots where it was easy to dig a cat hole. It was also fairly difficult to dig cat holes along the Ozark Highlands Trail. It’s not particularly enjoyable when you have to take a poop and you’re struggling to dig a cat hole. Hopefully there won’t be a lot of instances like this, but I’m sure there will be some. 

Rattlesnakes: My guess is, on the animal front, most people would say grizzly bears or mountain lions are their biggest fear (I frequently get asked if I’m bringing some sort of weapon to protect myself). For me it’s rattlesnakes. Grizzly bears and mountain lions are intimidating, for sure. However, in all the backpacking I have done, I have yet to see a mountain lion, and I have only seen one bear (a long way off). Thus I probably realize the chances of having a run in with either of those is fairly small, and a run in that results in injury even smaller still. However, I have heard a lot of thru hikers say they have come across multiple rattlesnakes. What scares me so much about rattlesnakes is the difficulty of seeing them, and thus getting too close without realizing it. I haven’t heard of any thru hikers who actually got bit, but I have heard plenty say they got quite close to the snake before realizing it was even there.   

Thunderstorms: I talked about this in my 2020 Lessons Learned blog. I love thunderstorms, unless I’m caught outside during one. With thru hiking, chances are quite high I’ll be stuck outside during one, probably several. There are several stretches of trail where there won’t be much cover either. This will probably be the most prevalent, and dangerous, fear I run into during the hike. 

Annual Trip With My Brother: My brother and I have done a multi-day backpacking trip in the mountains each year for the last 7 years. In part due to hiking the CDT this year, it’s not looking promising for getting our trip in this year, and it will be a bummer if we break the streak. But we’ll see what happens. Maybe we’ll be able to work something out. 

Letting Facial Hair Grow: I’m not a big fan of letting my facial hair grow out. I generally don’t go more than 3 or so days without shaving unless I’m backpacking. I currently don’t plan on shaving during this trip, which means it’s not going to take long for my facial hair to get longer than it has ever been before. We’ll see how that goes.

Over-Romanticizing: I have listened to so many people talk about their thru hikes and all of them have been overall positive. There have been bad days mixed in, but overall positive. Late in 2020 I read the book The Nature Fix by Florence Williams, which puts a really positive spin on spending time out in nature. In January I read Journeys North by Barney “Scout” Mann, which is about the journey of several people along the Pacific Crest Trail, and it was wonderful as well. I worry that all this is giving me too high of expectations for the hike, and I may not be prepared for, or I’ll struggle with, the difficult days when they happen. What if I get out there and it’s not living up to my expectations? Part of me thinks I should listen to a couple people who didn’t have a good experience on trail to help tamper my expectations. Haha. I’m definitely going to have to keep the quote at the bottom of this blog in mind.

Post Trail: This is the biggest fear of them all. Many hikers talk about getting “post trail depression” after completing one of these big thru hikes. Going back to “normal” life after an adventure like a thru hike can be quite difficult. I’m hoping job searching afterwards, as well as photo/video editing and potentially putting a book together, will at least give me something to keep me busy and prevent me from getting too down. However, if the job search starts to take a while, I could definitely see it being a struggle. What if things don’t work out? What if I can’t find a job I want? What if I’m stuck living with my parents for months and have to get a job I don’t like? 

At this point you’re probably asking yourself, “Why does he even want to do this hike?” Haha. While this is a long list, I think the potential pros in the end far outweigh the potential cons. I have plenty of reasons for doing this hike, which you can find in my blog I posted announcing my hike

And maybe it’s like that with every important aspect of your life. Whatever it is you are pursuing, whatever it is you are seeking, whatever it is you are creating, be carful not to quit too soon. As my friend Pastor Rob Bell warns: “Don’t rush through the experiences and circumstances that have the most capacity to transform you.” Don’t let go of your courage the moment things stop being easy or rewarding. Because that moment? That’s the moment when interesting begins.

Big Magic – Elizabeth Gilbert

CDT Prep – April 20, 2021

It has been pretty weird seeing the northbound CDT hikers starting (or preparing to start) their hikes while I still have a couple months to go. Even with a couple months left before my start, preparations are starting to pick up. I did a couple hikes along the Ozark Highlands Trail (OHT) during the last month to test out my new gear. They were great trial runs and I’m really glad I was able to get them in. I’ll put some links to blogs about the hikes at the end of this blog. Late last week I started printing off maps to carry along on the CDT. Over the weekend I took my first load of stuff to storage. I’ll likely take another load at the end of the month before my house goes on the market at the beginning of May. My last day at work should be June 1.

I was excited to find out a few weeks back that the east entrances to Glacier National Park (GNP) will be open this year. That means I will be able to follow the official CDT alternate route that starts at the Chief Mountain border crossing. I could have made it work otherwise, but it will be great to hike the CDT through GNP. I still don’t have a specific start date set yet. I probably won’t have an idea on that until early June. 

So while seeing others start their hikes makes me really want to get out there, it’s nice to be able to start more of the preparations myself. I’m sure my start date will be here before I know it, and I’m looking forward to running into the northbound hikers at some point 🙂

OHT: Woolum to Ozone Trip Report

OHT: Woolum to Ozone Shakedown Thoughts (Lessons Learned/Gear blog)

OHT: Ozone to Lake Ft. Smith Trip Report

OHT: Ozone to Lake Ft. Smith Shakedown Thoughts (Lessons Learned/Gear blog)

Ozark Highlands Trail: Shakedown Thoughts Pt. 2

Gear changes for the Ozone to Lake Ft. Smith section of the OHT.

Although it was a bummer to call it quits at Ozone on my first OHT hike when I had been planning on going all the way to Lake Ft. Smith (LFS), it did allow me to make some tweaks to gear and test those out after getting back on trail. You can read about my gear thoughts after the Woolum to Ozone section here. This blog will mainly cover the gear changes I made for the Ozone to LFS section and how those worked out. I’ll also cover a couple changes to make going forward. The image below lists out the gear I took on the Ozone to LFS hike.

Changes for Ozone to LFS

Camera/Video Gear: After my Woolum to Ozone hike I decided I needed to swap out my camera gear for something less bulky and lighter. I can put up with carrying my big DSLR on short trips, but carrying it for 3,100 miles was going to be a whole other deal. I decided on a Sony a6400. It was much lighter and more compact, and seemed like a good picture/video combo camera. I spent a good chunk of my free time between the two hikes trying to learn the camera. During my hike I found out it’s a little difficult using the same camera for photos and video, as I use different settings for each. I also generally have a polarizer on for photos and take it off for videos. I think I prefer my DSLR for photos, but it was definitely much nicer to carry the smaller camera. Part of the weight savings was offset by bringing along a gimbal for video. I haven’t gone through my video from the Ozone to LFS section, but I have a feeling between the new camera and gimbal, it will be a lot better than the video from my phone on the Woolum to Ozone section.

Footwear: This was a big one due to the blisters I got on the Woolum to Ozone hike. I decided to give my Darn Tough socks another try. I had used the Darn Tough socks before and had issues with really sore big toes, after which I switched to the running socks for a few different trips. I decided to try Injinji liners for the first time on this trip. I also used a surgeon’s knot on each shoe to try and keep my heel in place a little better. Finally, I brought along some sandals to use for creek crossings and wearing around camp. During the day I would usually swap out my socks at least once for some dry socks. I often felt like I was getting blisters during the trip, but I never actually had one form. That was definitely a good sign. Hopefully it stays that way for the CDT.

Insulated Booties: I have had some backpacking trips before where I had some issues with cold feet. Generally I’ll bring along a spare pair of socks to use for sleeping to help with that. Earlier this year when we had a really cold stretch of weather I tested out my sleeping gear to see how low I was willing to go with temperature. It actually did quite well, but I struggled with cold feet. After that I did a little research and came across the Enlightened Equipment Sidekicks. I ordered these before my Woolum to Ozone hike but didn’t get them until afterwards, so I decided to give them a try on this trip even though it wasn’t supposed to be particularly cold. I loved them. They were great to have on during the evening if I was just sitting around at camp, and they were great to have on in the sleeping bag. The only bummer about them is I can’t wear them to walk around. But for keeping my feet warm in the sleeping bag or sitting at camp, they worked great.

Ice Axe/Micro spikes: You’re probably wondering what the heck I was doing carrying an ice axe and micro spikes on the OHT. It was purely for practice packing them along. I wanted to see if I had any issues with where I packed them or put them on my pack. I didn’t come across any issues other than the ice axe makes it a little bit more difficult to go under low trees/branches. I would like to get out on some snow prior to getting on the CDT to get some practice with the micro spikes and ice axe, but I’m not sure if I’ll get around to that or not.

Changes to Make Going Forward

Chapstick: I’ll normally bring a tube of chapstick along on hikes, but for some reason I didn’t on this trip and I regretted it. I think that’s the worst chapped lips I have ever had, although thankfully they never split real bad. It finally got to the point to where I was putting olive oil on them to try and help them out. I’ll have to be sure and take some chapstick along on future hikes.

Mount gimbal/camera: Each time I wanted to take a video, I had to take the gimbal out of it’s bag, take the camera out of it’s bag, put the camera on the gimbal, get the gimbal set up, take the video, take the camera off the gimbal, put the camera up, and then put the gimbal up. It was quite the process. Haha. I’ll have to take some time to see if I can figure out a way to mount the gimbal with camera attached to my shoulder strap to make it easier to take video. The setup I used would work pretty well to protect the camera and gimbal in inclement weather, but it would be nice to have them more available during better weather.

Gloves: I used some brushtail possum gloves from Zpacks, and while they seemed to do a decent job at keeping my hands warm, they got hair everywhere. It nearly looked like I was bringing some sort of pet along with me at times. Haha. I’m not sure if I’ll switch them out, but I’ll at least look into other options.

Stretching: I always stretch after my runs, but for some reason I have never stretched after I finish a day of backpacking. I listened to a podcast during this trip where there was a discussion about stretching while thru hiking, and yet I still didn’t remember to do it. Haha. I need to get into the habit of stretching a bit each day after I finish hiking. I’m sure it would help.

Closing Thoughts

Overall I was quite happy with my gear after this hike. I’m a little bit worried about being on the heavy side, but I have thought and thought and thought about my gear and feel like this is the best fit for me, so I’ll give it a shot. It’s definitely doable, but will make the CDT a little more difficult. I feel much better about my gear after the Ozone to LFS section than I did before. I’m sure there will still be tweaks made as I prepare for the CDT and as I go along the CDT, but I feel like I’m at a good starting point.